Presuming a nature in the context of resilience

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dc.identifier.uri http://dx.doi.org/10.15488/5561
dc.identifier.uri https://www.repo.uni-hannover.de/handle/123456789/5613
dc.contributor.author Chazapis, Antonis
dc.contributor.author Loukos, Dimitris
dc.date.accessioned 2019-10-23T13:23:28Z
dc.date.issued 2018
dc.identifier.citation Chazapis, Antonis; Loukos, Dimitris: Presuming a nature in the context of resilience. In: Othengrafen, F.; Serraos, K. (Eds.): Urban Resilience, Climate Change and Adaptation. Coping with Heat Islands in the Dense Urban Area of Athens, Greece. Hannover : Leibniz Universität Hannover, Institut für Umweltplanung, 2018, S. 33-48 ger
dc.description.abstract Over the last decades, the debate on climate change has brought back the everlasting discussion on the conceptualization of nature and the delimitation of our relationship with it. The emergence of „destruction“ has been instrumental in transforming moral evil to natural, viz the transition from the mechanistic-instrumental view of nature to a romantic one, where the superiority of “logos” over nature is now reversed. In the context of this conceptual shift, the rhetoric of „security“ was raised, and today is mainly expressed through the mechanisms of „mechanistic resilience“, namely the persistence in an ideal, almost a metaphysical equilibrium state of functioning of all biotic and abiotic systems. However, at the same time and in the context of ecological science, in recent decades, parallel transformations have also occurred in the notion of “resilience”. The latter is no longer defined on the basis of maintaining a balance, but rather adapting to lasting change (part of which is the “destruction”) which is recognized as a structural element of all natural and non- natural processes. If faith in the equilibrium tried to respond to a “revengeful nature” or a nature perceived as danger then which nature responds to adaptation? Accepting the latter as the new state of optimum functioning means that we must accept a new notion of evil that stems from the theory of resilience but ultimately expands to the „construction“ of a nature. eng
dc.language.iso eng
dc.publisher Hannover : Leibniz Universität Hannover, Institut für Umweltplanung
dc.relation.ispartof https://doi.org/10.15488/5555
dc.rights CC BY 3.0 DE
dc.rights.uri https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/de/
dc.subject Climate change ger
dc.subject Urban area ger
dc.subject Heat islands ger
dc.subject Resilience ger
dc.subject.ddc 710 | Landschaftsgestaltung, Raumplanung ger
dc.title Presuming a nature in the context of resilience
dc.type bookPart
dc.type report
dc.type Text
dc.bibliographicCitation.firstPage 33
dc.bibliographicCitation.lastPage 48
dc.description.version publishedVersion
tib.accessRights frei zug�nglich


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