Manipulating the antioxidant capacity of halophytes to increase their cultural and economic value through saline cultivation

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dc.identifier.uri http://dx.doi.org/10.15488/954
dc.identifier.uri http://www.repo.uni-hannover.de/handle/123456789/978
dc.contributor.author Boestfleisch, Christian
dc.contributor.author Wagenseil, Niko B.
dc.contributor.author Buhmann, Anne K.
dc.contributor.author Seal, Charlotte E.
dc.contributor.author Merrett Wade, E.
dc.contributor.author Muscolo, Adele
dc.contributor.author Papenbrock, Jutta
dc.date.accessioned 2016-12-22T07:48:53Z
dc.date.available 2016-12-22T07:48:53Z
dc.date.issued 2014
dc.identifier.citation Boestfleisch, C.; Wagenseil, N.B.; Buhmann, A.K.; Seal, C.E.; MerrettWade, E.; et al.: Manipulating the antioxidant capacity of halophytes to increase their cultural and economic value through saline cultivation. In: AoB PLANTS 6 (2014), plu046. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1093/aobpla/plu046
dc.description.abstract Halophytes, salt-tolerant plants, are a source of valuable secondary metabolites with potential economic value. The steady-state pools of many stress-relatedmetabolites are already enhanced in halophytes when compared with glycophytes, but growth under conditions away from the optimum can induce stress and consequently result in changes to secondary metabolites such as antioxidants. However, direct evidence for increasing the concentration of valuable secondary metabolites as a consequence of altering the salinity of the growing environment still remains equivocal. To address this, we analysed a range of metabolites with antioxidant capacity (including total phenols, flavonoids, ascorbate, reduced/oxidized glutathione and reactive oxygen species scavenging enzymes) in seedlings and plants from different families (Amaranthaceae, Brassicaceae, Plantaginaceae and Rhizophoraceae) and habitats grown under different salt concentrations. We show that it is possible to manipulate the antioxidant capacity of plants and seedlings by altering the saline growing environment, the length of time under saline cultivation and the developmental stage. Among the species studied, the halophytes Tripoliumpannonicum, Plantago coronopus, Lepidiumlatifolium and Salicornia europaea demonstrated the most potential as functional foods or nutraceuticals. eng
dc.description.sponsorship Deutsche Bundesstiftung Umwelt/AZ 27708
dc.description.sponsorship COST/STSM FA0901-041011-011415
dc.language.iso eng
dc.publisher Oxford : Oxford University Press
dc.relation.ispartofseries AoB PLANTS 6 (2014)
dc.rights CC BY 4.0 Unported
dc.rights.uri https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subject Halophytes eng
dc.subject Nutraceuticals eng
dc.subject Secondary metabolites eng
dc.subject Stress tolerance eng
dc.subject Yield eng
dc.subject.ddc 580 | Pflanzen (Botanik) ger
dc.title Manipulating the antioxidant capacity of halophytes to increase their cultural and economic value through saline cultivation
dc.type article
dc.type Text
dc.relation.issn 20412851
dc.relation.doi https://doi.org/10.1093/aobpla/plu046
dc.bibliographicCitation.volume 6
dc.bibliographicCitation.firstPage plu046
dc.description.version publishedVersion
tib.accessRights frei zug�nglich


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