Biaxial tensile tests identify epidermis and hypodermis as the main structural elements of sweet cherry skin

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dc.identifier.uri http://dx.doi.org/10.15488/562
dc.identifier.uri http://www.repo.uni-hannover.de/handle/123456789/586
dc.contributor.author Brüggenwirth, Martin
dc.contributor.author Fricke, Heiko
dc.contributor.author Knoche, Moritz
dc.date.accessioned 2016-10-28T09:54:27Z
dc.date.available 2016-10-28T09:54:27Z
dc.date.issued 2014
dc.identifier.citation Brüggenwirth, Martin; Fricke, Heiko; Knoche, Moritz: Biaxial tensile tests identify epidermis and hypodermis as the main structural elements of sweet cherry skin. In: AoB PLANTS 6 (2014), plu019. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/aobpla/plu019
dc.description.abstract The skin of developing soft and fleshy fruit is subjected to considerable growth stress, and failure of the skin is associated with impaired barrier properties in water transport and pathogen defence. The objectives were to establish a standardized, biaxial tensile test of the skin of soft and fleshy fruit and to use it to characterize and quantify mechanical properties of the sweet cherry (Prunus avium) fruit skin as a model. A segment of the exocarp (ES) comprising cuticle, epidermis, hypodermis and adhering flesh was mounted in the elastometer such that the in vivo strain was maintained. The ES was pressurized from the inner surface and the pressure and extent of associated bulging were recorded. Pressure: strain responses were almost linear up to the point of fracture, indicating that the modulus of elasticity was nearly constant. Abrading the cuticle decreased the fracture strain but had no effect on the fracture pressure. When pressure was held constant, bulging of the ES continued to increase. Strain relaxation upon releasing the pressure was complete and depended on time. Strains in longitudinal and latitudinal directions on the bulging ES did not differ significantly. Exocarp segments that released their in vivo strain before the test had higher fracture strains and lower moduli of elasticity. The results demonstrate that the cherry skin is isotropic in the tangential plane and exhibits elastic and viscoelastic behaviour. The epidermis and hypodermis, but not the cuticle, represent the structural 'backbone' in a cherry skin. This test is useful in quantifying the mechanical properties of soft and fleshy fruit of a range of species under standardized conditions. eng
dc.description.sponsorship DFG/KN402/8-1
dc.language.iso eng
dc.publisher Oxford : Oxford University Press
dc.relation.ispartofseries AoB PLANTS 6 (2014)
dc.rights CC BY 3.0 Unported
dc.rights.uri https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/
dc.subject Biomechanics eng
dc.subject fracture eng
dc.subject mechanical properties eng
dc.subject Prunus avium eng
dc.subject rheology eng
dc.subject skin eng
dc.subject stiffness eng
dc.subject strain eng
dc.subject.ddc 500 | Naturwissenschaften ger
dc.subject.ddc 580 | Pflanzen (Botanik) ger
dc.title Biaxial tensile tests identify epidermis and hypodermis as the main structural elements of sweet cherry skin eng
dc.type article
dc.type Text
dc.relation.issn 2041-2851
dc.relation.doi http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/aobpla/plu019
dc.bibliographicCitation.volume 6
dc.bibliographicCitation.firstPage plu019
dc.description.version publishedVersion
tib.accessRights frei zug�nglich


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