A well-informed 'model of administration' for agrarian states. Or: how not to fall into the trap of 'nostrification' when comparing colonial West African States with 18th century Prussia

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dc.identifier.uri http://dx.doi.org/10.15488/4862
dc.identifier.uri https://www.repo.uni-hannover.de/handle/123456789/4905
dc.contributor.author Treiber, Hubert
dc.date.accessioned 2019-05-23T08:19:39Z
dc.date.available 2019-05-23T08:19:39Z
dc.date.issued 2015
dc.identifier.citation Treiber, H.: A well-informed 'model of administration' for agrarian states. Or: how not to fall into the trap of 'nostrification' when comparing colonial West African States with 18th century Prussia. In: Società Mutamento Politica 6 (2015), Nr. 12, S. 303-319. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.13128/SMP-17860
dc.description.abstract In a noteworthy essay entitled "The Operation Called Vergleichen (Comparison)" Joachim Matthes has drawn attention to the fact that studies which claim to compare particular phenomena from one's own culture (such as law or administration, for example) with those of an alien culture do not, strictly speaking, perform a real comparison. Instead, what takes place is (in his words) a " nostrification", that is, " an appropriation of the other in one's own terms" or conceptual assimilation. Even the ideal-type constructions of Max Weber seem largely to confirm this proposition. In principle, then, it ought to be quite hard to find studies which are not exposed to the charge of nostrification. In what follows works by Gerd Spittler are examined in some detail from this particular perspective. In the first instance Spittler investigated the specific problems encountered by the colonial administration in West African peasant states (1919-39), before examining if this problematic could be applied to the peasant state of Prussia in the 18th century. So, for example, he asked himself how a bureaucratic administration reliant on written documents resolved the problem of raising taxes on a body of untruly peasants who to a large extent communicated orally amongst themselves. Since in both cases Spittler relates the typical structures of an agrarian society to typical administrative structures, he attains a level of reflection where the "One" can be translated into the "Other" and vice versa' (Matthes), and in this way he escapes the particular danger of nostrification. eng
dc.language.iso eng
dc.publisher Firenze : Firenze University Press
dc.relation.ispartofseries Società Mutamento Politica 6 (2015), Nr. 12
dc.rights CC BY 4.0
dc.rights.uri https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subject West African peasant states eng
dc.subject Agrarian society eng
dc.subject Nostrification eng
dc.subject.ddc 340 | Recht ger
dc.title A well-informed 'model of administration' for agrarian states. Or: how not to fall into the trap of 'nostrification' when comparing colonial West African States with 18th century Prussia
dc.type article
dc.type Text
dc.relation.issn 2038-3150
dc.relation.doi http://dx.doi.org/10.13128/SMP-17860
dc.bibliographicCitation.firstPage 303
dc.bibliographicCitation.lastPage 319
dc.description.version publishedVersion
tib.accessRights frei zug�nglich


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