Plutonium release from Fukushima Daiichi fosters the need for more detailed investigations

Show simple item record

dc.identifier.uri http://dx.doi.org/10.15488/448
dc.identifier.uri http://www.repo.uni-hannover.de/handle/123456789/471
dc.contributor.author Schneider, Stephanie
dc.contributor.author Walther, Clemens
dc.contributor.author Bister, Stefan
dc.contributor.author Schauer, Viktoria
dc.contributor.author Christl, Marcus
dc.contributor.author Synal, Hans-Arno
dc.contributor.author Shozugawa, Katsumi
dc.contributor.author Steinhauser, Georg
dc.date.accessioned 2016-08-29T13:44:49Z
dc.date.available 2016-08-29T13:44:49Z
dc.date.issued 2013-10-18
dc.identifier.citation Schneider, Stephanie; Walther, Clemens; Bister, Stefan; Schauer, Viktoria; Christl, Marcus et al.: Plutonium release from Fukushima Daiichi fosters the need for more detailed investigations. In: Scientific Reports 3 (2013), 2988. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/srep02988
dc.description.abstract The contamination of Japan after the Fukushima accident has been investigated mainly for volatile fission products, but only sparsely for actinides such as plutonium. Only small releases of actinides were estimated in Fukushima. Plutonium is still omnipresent in the environment from previous atmospheric nuclear weapons tests. We investigated soil and plants sampled at different hot spots in Japan, searching for reactor-borne plutonium using its isotopic ratio Pu-240/Pu-239. By using accelerator mass spectrometry, we clearly demonstrated the release of Pu from the Fukushima Daiichi power plant: While most samples contained only the radionuclide signature of fallout plutonium, there is at least one vegetation sample whose isotope ratio (0.381 +/- 0.046) evidences that the Pu originates from a nuclear reactor (Pu239+240 activity concentration 0.49 Bq/kg). Plutonium content and isotope ratios differ considerably even for very close sampling locations, e.g. the soil and the plants growing on it. This strong localization indicates a particulate Pu release, which is of high radiological risk if incorporated. eng
dc.description.sponsorship CDC NIOSH Mountain and Plains Education and Research Center/T42OH009229-07
dc.description.sponsorship NRC/NRC-HQ-12-G-38-0044
dc.description.sponsorship CDC NIOSH Mountain and Plains Education and Research Center/T42OH009229-07
dc.description.sponsorship NRC/NRC-HQ-12-G-38-0044
dc.language.iso eng
dc.publisher Lausanne : Frontiers Research Foundation
dc.relation.ispartofseries Scientific Reports 3 (2013)
dc.rights CC BY-NC-ND 3.0
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/
dc.subject power-plant accident eng
dc.subject nuclear accident eng
dc.subject japanese soils eng
dc.subject ams facility eng
dc.subject isotopes eng
dc.subject pu eng
dc.subject identification eng
dc.subject radionuclides eng
dc.subject contamination eng
dc.subject environment eng
dc.subject.ddc 530 | Physik ger
dc.title Plutonium release from Fukushima Daiichi fosters the need for more detailed investigations
dc.type article
dc.type Text
dc.relation.issn 2045-2322
dc.relation.doi http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/srep02988
dc.bibliographicCitation.volume 3
dc.bibliographicCitation.firstPage 2988
dc.description.version publishedVersion
tib.accessRights frei zug�nglich


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s):

Show simple item record

 

Search the repository


Browse

My Account

Usage Statistics