Fecal parasite risk in the endangered proboscis monkey is higher in an anthropogenically managed forest environment compared to a riparian rain forest in Sabah, Borneo

Show simple item record

dc.identifier.uri http://dx.doi.org/10.15488/3189
dc.identifier.uri http://www.repo.uni-hannover.de/handle/123456789/3219
dc.contributor.author Klaus, Annette
dc.contributor.author Strube, Christina
dc.contributor.author Röper, Kathrin Monika
dc.contributor.author Radespiel, Ute
dc.contributor.author Schaarschmidt, Frank
dc.contributor.author Nathan, Senthilvel
dc.contributor.author Goossens, Benoit
dc.contributor.author Zimmermann, Elke
dc.date.accessioned 2018-04-27T12:01:40Z
dc.date.available 2018-04-27T12:01:40Z
dc.date.issued 2018
dc.identifier.citation Klaus, A.; Strube, C.; Röper, K.M.; Radespiel, U.; Schaarschmidt, F. et al.: Fecal parasite risk in the endangered proboscis monkey is higher in an anthropogenically managed forest environment compared to a riparian rain forest in Sabah, Borneo. In: PLoS ONE 13 (2018), Nr. 4, e0195584. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0195584
dc.description.abstract Understanding determinants shaping infection risk of endangered wildlife is a major topic in conservation medicine. The proboscis monkey, Nasalis larvatus, an endemic primate flagship species for conservation in Borneo, is endangered through habitat loss, but can still be found in riparian lowland and mangrove forests, and in some protected areas. To assess socioecological and anthropogenic influence on intestinal helminth infections in N. larvatus, 724 fecal samples of harem and bachelor groups, varying in size and the number of juveniles, were collected between June and October 2012 from two study sites in Malaysian Borneo: 634 samples were obtained from groups inhabiting the Lower Kinabatangan Wildlife Sanctuary (LKWS), 90 samples were collected from groups of the Labuk Bay Proboscis Monkey Sanctuary (LBPMS), where monkeys are fed on stationary feeding platforms. Parasite risk was quantified by intestinal helminth prevalence, host parasite species richness (PSR), and eggs per gram feces (epg). Generalized linear mixed effect models were applied to explore whether study site, group type, group size, the number of juveniles per group, and sampling month predict parasite risk. At the LBPMS, prevalence and epg of Trichuris spp., strongylids, and Strongyloides spp. but not Ascaris spp., as well as host PSR were significantly elevated. Only for Strongyloides spp., prevalence showed significant changes between months; at both sites, the beginning rainy season with increased precipitation was linked to higher prevalence, suggesting the external life cycle of Strongyloides spp. to benefit from humidity. Higher prevalence, epgs, and PSR within the LBPMS suggest that anthropogenic factors shape host infection risk more than socioecological factors, most likely via higher re-infection rates and chronic stress. Noninvasive measurement of fecal parasite stages is an important tool for assessing transmission dynamics and infection risks for endangered tropical wildlife. Findings will contribute to healthcare management in nature and in anthropogenically managed environments. eng
dc.language.iso eng
dc.publisher San Francisco, CA : Public Library of Science
dc.relation.ispartofseries PLoS ONE 13 (2018), Nr. 4
dc.rights CC BY 4.0
dc.rights.uri https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subject Nasalis larvatus eng
dc.subject Borneo eng
dc.subject parasite species richness (PSR) eng
dc.subject fecal parasite risk eng
dc.subject Lower Kinabatangan Wildlife Sanctuary (LKWS) eng
dc.subject Labuk Bay Proboscis Monkey Sanctuary (LBPMS) eng
dc.subject monkey eng
dc.subject.ddc 500 | Naturwissenschaften ger
dc.subject.ddc 610 | Medizin, Gesundheit ger
dc.title Fecal parasite risk in the endangered proboscis monkey is higher in an anthropogenically managed forest environment compared to a riparian rain forest in Sabah, Borneo
dc.type article
dc.type Text
dc.relation.issn 1932-6203
dc.relation.doi https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0195584
dc.bibliographicCitation.issue 4
dc.bibliographicCitation.volume 13
dc.bibliographicCitation.firstPage e0195584
dc.description.version publishedVersion
tib.accessRights frei zug�nglich


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s):

Show simple item record

 

Search the repository


Browse

My Account

Usage Statistics