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dc.identifier.uri http://dx.doi.org/10.15488/2211
dc.identifier.uri http://www.repo.uni-hannover.de/handle/123456789/2236
dc.contributor.author Cordero, Raul R.
dc.contributor.author Seckmeyer, Gunther
dc.contributor.author Damiani, Alessandro
dc.contributor.author Riechelmann, Stefan
dc.contributor.author Rayas, Juan
dc.contributor.author Labbe, Fernando
dc.contributor.author Laroze, David
dc.date.accessioned 2017-11-01T13:25:05Z
dc.date.available 2017-11-01T13:25:05Z
dc.date.issued 2014
dc.identifier.citation Cordero, R.R.; Seckmeyer, G.; Damiani, A.; Riechelmann, S.; Rayas, J. et al.: The world's highest levels of surface UV. In: Photochemical and Photobiological Sciences 13 (2014), Nr. 1, S. 70-81. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1039/c3pp50221j
dc.description.abstract Chile's northern Atacama Desert has been pointed out as one of the places on earth where the world's highest surface ultraviolet (UV) may occur. This area is characterized by its high altitude, prevalent cloudless conditions and relatively low total ozone column. Aimed at detecting those peak UV levels, we carried out in January 2013 ground-based spectral measurements on the Chajnantor Plateau (5100 m altitude, 23°00′S, 67°45′W) and at the Paranal Observatory (2635 m altitude, 24°37′S, 70°24′W). The UV index computed from our spectral measurements peaked at 20 on the Chajnantor Plateau (under broken cloud conditions) and at 16 at the Paranal Observatory (under cloudless conditions). Spectral measurements carried out in June 2005 at the Izaña Observatory (2367 m altitude, 28°18′N, 16°30′W) were used for further comparisons. Due to the differences in sun-earth separation, total ozone column, altitude, albedo, aerosols and clouds, peak UV levels are expected to be significantly higher at southern hemisphere sites than at their northern hemisphere counterparts. © 2014 The Royal Society of Chemistry and Owner Societies. eng
dc.language.iso eng
dc.publisher Cambridge : Royal Society of Chemistry
dc.relation.ispartofseries Photochemical and Photobiological Sciences 13 (2014), Nr. 1
dc.rights Es gilt deutsches Urheberrecht. Das Dokument darf zum eigenen Gebrauch kostenfrei genutzt, aber nicht im Internet bereitgestellt oder an Außenstehende weitergegeben werden. Dieser Beitrag ist aufgrund einer (DFG-geförderten) Allianz- bzw. Nationallizenz frei zugänglich.
dc.subject ozone eng
dc.subject altitude eng
dc.subject article eng
dc.subject chemistry eng
dc.subject Chile eng
dc.subject human eng
dc.subject radiation dose eng
dc.subject radiometry eng
dc.subject season eng
dc.subject sunlight eng
dc.subject ultraviolet radiation eng
dc.subject Altitude eng
dc.subject Chile eng
dc.subject Humans eng
dc.subject Ozone eng
dc.subject Radiation Dosage eng
dc.subject Radiometry eng
dc.subject Seasons eng
dc.subject Sunlight eng
dc.subject Ultraviolet Rays eng
dc.subject.ddc 540 | Chemie ger
dc.title The world's highest levels of surface UV
dc.type article
dc.type Text
dc.relation.issn 1474-905X
dc.relation.doi https://doi.org/10.1039/c3pp50221j
dc.bibliographicCitation.issue 1
dc.bibliographicCitation.volume 13
dc.bibliographicCitation.firstPage 70
dc.bibliographicCitation.lastPage 81
dc.description.version publishedVersion
tib.accessRights frei zug�nglich


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