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White, L.; Van Basshuysen, P.: Without a trace : Why did corona apps fail?. In: Journal of Medical Ethics 2021 (2021). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1136/medethics-2020-107061

Version im Repositorium

Zum Zitieren der Version im Repositorium verwenden Sie bitte diesen DOI: https://doi.org/10.15488/10548

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Summe der Downloads: 57




Kleine Vorschau
Zusammenfassung: 
At the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, high hopes were put on digital contact tracing, using mobile phone apps to record and immediately notify contacts when a user reports as infected. Such apps can now be downloaded in many countries, but as second waves of COVID-19 are raging, these apps are playing a less important role than anticipated. We argue that this is because most countries have opted for app configurations that cannot provide a means of rapidly informing users of likely infections while avoiding too many false positive reports. Mathematical modelling suggests that differently configured apps have the potential to do this. These require, however, that some pseudonymised data be stored on a central server, which privacy advocates have cautioned against. We contend that their influential arguments are subject to two fallacies. First, they have tended to one-sidedly focus on the risks that centralised data storage entails for privacy, while paying insufficient attention to the fact that inefficient contact tracing involves ethical risks too. Second, while the envisioned system does entail risks of breaches, such risks are also present in decentralised systems, which have been falsely presented as € privacy preserving by design'. When these points are understood, it becomes clear that we must rethink our approach to digital contact tracing in our fight against COVID-19. © Author(s) (or their employer(s)) 2021. Re-use permitted under CC BY-NC. No commercial re-use. See rights and permissions. Published by BMJ.
Lizenzbestimmungen: CC BY-NC 4.0 Unported
Publikationstyp: article
Publikationsstatus: publishedVersion
Erstveröffentlichung: 2021
Die Publikation erscheint in Sammlung(en):Philosophische Fakultät

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Pos. Land Downloads
Anzahl Proz.
1 image of flag of Germany Germany 45 78,95%
2 image of flag of United States United States 5 8,77%
3 image of flag of Netherlands Netherlands 4 7,02%
4 image of flag of China China 2 3,51%
5 image of flag of Czech Republic Czech Republic 1 1,75%

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